6.1 Campaign timetable

Time spent planning activities is time saved during the campaign. Good preparation reduces the chances of unforeseen problems and increases the quality of the operation. Planning errors are difficult to correct once the campaign is underway.

In epidemic situations the population is often keen to get vaccinated and delays due to poor planning (e.g., vaccine shortages, cold chain failures and incorrect practices) can cause tension or even rioting.

One of the first steps is drawing up a timetable, which shows the timing of the preparation, implementation and evaluation activities for the campaign.

One of the first steps is drawing up a timetable, which shows the timing of the preparation, implementation and evaluation activities for the campaign (Appendix 17).

This work plan is used to coordinate the actions to be implemented within a given time frame. It should be followed and adapted to the needs.

The timetable should specify:
– the list of tasks to be done by category (committees, human resources, awareness-raising and social mobilisation, etc.);
– the name of the person responsible for each task;
– the schedule of activities.

Using the timetable:
– allows specific, detailed activity planning;
– ensures that nothing is forgotten when implementing activities;
– ensures that everyone knows his or her role;
– allows day-today monitoring of preparations;
– allows verification that each task has been done in due time;
– permits responsiveness when additional resources are needed.

Ideally, emergency vaccination activities can be set up in 8 to 10 days, 15 days maximum.

The campaign begins only when all preparations are complete:
– vaccines and supplies are in place (no just-in-time operations);
– surveillance tools are available;
– teams are trained;
– logistics are ready (cold chain, site storage and equipment/supply, waste collection and disposal system, transport);
– population has been informed: see Chapter 2.